What will happen if i change a clubs graphite shaft into a stainless steel shaft?

I have a callway x20 graphite shaft iron set. I wanted to change the shaft to stainless steel but i was thinking if it would affect the performance of the club.


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9 Responses to “What will happen if i change a clubs graphite shaft into a stainless steel shaft?”

  1. legalbgl says:

    by Terdabis H "One of the main differances between grap and steel is that graphite shapts are a lighter shaft and it allows to garnish up to 5 mph more extra speed. More clubhead speed equals longer distance. Most pros use graphite for this reason. If your handicap is around 15 like mine i suggest using graphite for the extra speed and distance"

    Graphite shafts a lighter and alow more swing speed, but most pros use steel shafts. They generate the swing speed on their own and like the control from the steel, as well as the feedback the steel gives them when they swing.

  2. Terdabis H says:

    One of the main differances between grap and steel is that graphite shapts are a lighter shaft and it allows to garnish up to 5 mph more extra speed. More clubhead speed equals longer distance. Most pros use graphite for this reason. If your handicap is around 15 like mine i suggest using graphite for the extra speed and distance

  3. iDriveAlude says:

    Here’s what I was able to find for you in more detail.

    The biggest and by far most important difference between steel and graphite shafts is this: graphite shafts are lighter than steel shafts. So clubs that have graphite shafts will be lighter than otherwise identical clubs that have steel shafts.

    According to clubmaking and equipment guru Tom Wishon, the difference in weight between graphite shafts and steel shafts will translate, for most golfers, into an additional 2-4 mph of swing speed with graphite. And that could mean an extra 6-12 yards of distance with a graphite shaft, compared to a steel shaft.

    That’s why, in the everpresent quest for more yards, more and more golfers prefer graphite shafts.

    What It All Means
    You probably want more yards, too. So it’s obvious: You should choose graphite shafts, right? Probably, but not necessarily.

    As we said, the majority of golfers these days are going to graphite, at least in their woods, but steel shafts maintain a very strong presence in golf, especially among low-handicappers and scratch players.

    In many cases, those are golfers who don’t need the extra boost of swing speed that graphite shafts can provide. Players who prefer steel shafts often make that choice because their heavier weight provides the golfer with a feeling of more control over the clubhead during the swing. And these are players who can analyze and benefit from the added feedback (more vibrations traveling up the shaft) that steel provides.

    We’ll quote Tom Wishon: "If gaining more distance is a primary goal for the golfer, they should definitely be fit with the proper graphite shaft design in their woods and irons to match their swing. On the other hand, if distance is not the main focus for the golfer because they already have a high swing speed, if they like the feel of steel and their swing tempo matches a little better to the higher total weight steel shafts bring to the clubs, then steel is the better option."

    And we’ll add that anyone who is not physically strong, or has physical problems in their hands, forearms or shoulders that are exacerbated by the bad vibes of a mis-hit shot, should go with graphite.

    Hope this helps you, the way I see it is graphite is for women and old men lol. The rest of us are physically fit enough to swing the steel shaft with no problem.

    And pros don’t use graphite shafts, they use steel for the added feel it gives them.

  4. Juan says:

    Terdabis is mostly correct. The changing of shafts does not affect the performance of the head. Like he said the shaft will will be lighter which allows the club to be longer with the same swing weight or even a lighter swing weight. Also most graphite shafts are designed for the player that the flex was built for. With a graphite shaft this is easier to control because the manufacturer can put plies of material where they need to stiffen the shaft in order to achieve the flex profile desired. People use to use steel shafts because they had lower torque than graphite. Today graphite manufacturers have methods of making and controlling the making of a shaft so that it is stiffer and lighter than steel. But in the end it all comes down to personal preference.

  5. Mike H says:

    Steel provide more control, but less club speed. You’ll be sacrificing maybe 5-10 yards with your irons, and they’ll help you a little with your accuracy. Both are good choices as there are successful pro golfers that use steel, and those who use graphite. What it comes down to is what you would rather have: A little more speed or a little more accuracy.

  6. JOSEPHLB says:

    If you need the performance and accuracy of steel… but with a lighter weight.. there are lightweight steel shaft options available..

    True Temper Dynalite
    True Temper Dynalite Gold SL
    True Temper TX90
    True Temper GS75 (raw weight of 86 grams)

    FST 90 Ultra Light (new.. may be hard to find.. raw weight of 100 grams)
    FST Satin Silver (100 grams, raw)

    Nippon N.S. Pro 8950GH (around 95 gram’s.. pricey.. but well worth it)

    Royal Precision Microlite 80 (as low as 78 grams, cut , in PW)

  7. Flatstick says:

    Steel is heavier than graphite, so if you swing exactly the same your clubhead speed will be a little less and your distance will decrease. You might have less torque with the steel however which means less twisting on off center hits, and the ball will stay straighter.

  8. Patriot says:

    Graphite shafts also trail your hands leaving the club head open longer. The Graphit flexes easier on the down swing that also takes adjustment.

  9. Chuck E says:

    First let me say anytime you make a equipment change be sure to see your local PGA professional for assistance. To me the biggest benefit of steel shafts has been the durability of my clubs and the consistency of the flex of the steel shafts over graphite. My theory is graphite Driver and fairway woods steel irons. Unless your in the fifty and over crowd with hand problems than graphite is the deal. As far as switching shafts in your current clubs not only is the flex important but so is the swing weight and kick point. Be careful to match what you have now to something that is going to achieve your goals. See your local PGA professional its their job to help you and they happily will as opposed to paying to have yourself tested

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